ran hunspell
authorDaniel <thefekete@gmail.com>
Wed, 24 Jun 2020 22:19:28 +0000 (00:19 +0200)
committerDaniel <thefekete@gmail.com>
Wed, 24 Jun 2020 22:19:28 +0000 (00:19 +0200)
blog/2020-06-24_faking-resolution.md

index 9e7aeae..b3582f2 100644 (file)
@@ -1,10 +1,10 @@
-% Faking your resolution for screencasts or screenshots
+% Faking your resolution for screen-casts or screenshots
 
 # The set up
 
 I've got a really cheap laptop.
 I've also got a i7 Lenovo x230 powerhouse.
-They both have a screen resolution of 1366x768, which I usually don't mind too much, unless I want to make a screencast or take a screenshot of a really detailed logic analyzer capture or something.
+They both have a screen resolution of 1366x768, which I usually don't mind too much, unless I want to make a screen-cast or take a screenshot of a really detailed logic analyzer capture or something.
 
 Now, I could plug into my 4K TV or 1080p monitor, but getting off the couch just to take a screenshot? No, there's a better way..
 
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ Note that if your physical resolution is not 1366x768, then you'll need to adjus
   <dt>--output eDP1</dt>
   <dd>This tells xrandr which physical monitor you want to play around with. Check the output of <kbd>xrandr</kbd> to figure out what yours is.</dd>
   <dt>--mode 1366x768</dt>
-  <dd>Here we're telling xrandr the physical resolution we want to have. Set it to your monitor/screen's native resoltion. Again, running <kbd>xrandr</kbd> without any arguments is your friend here.</dd>
+  <dd>Here we're telling xrandr the physical resolution we want to have. Set it to your monitor/screen's native resolution. Again, running <kbd>xrandr</kbd> without any arguments is your friend here.</dd>
   <dt>--panning 1920x1080</dt>
   <dd>Now it gets interesting. Here, we tell xrandr to go ahead and give us a 1080p screen, allowing us to pan around with the mouse if needed.</dd>
   <dt>--scale 1.405x1.406</dt>